Webinar Invite – Taking HR to New Heights


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For those employers interested, we are conducting a Webinar about HR and HR Technology that can change the way you think about HR. We guarantee you will hear a perspective on the market that will get you thinking. We have done this live and employers have said, “You made 4 or 5 points that I have never heard before.”

The market is changing and the opportunity to “Take HR to New Heights” exists. The problem is most employers don’t get there because of all the obstacles in the way. We analyzed the market and identified 54 obstacles to success. This webinar will expose those obstacles and provide an action plan to take HR to New Heights.

If you would like to attend please click on this link. REGISTER NOW . This is reserved for employers or partners of ProHCM only.

The Southwest Approach to HR and Benefits Technology


Recently I flew from Boston to Ft. Lauderdale on a Boeing 737 with engines made by General Electric. I had a window seat, Wi-Fi, and I got a Diet Coke on the plane. I reached my destination comfortably and on-time. A few weeks prior to that I flew on a Boeing 737 with GE Engines from Boston to Chicago. I had a window seat, Wi-Fi, and a Diet Coke. I was much less comfortable and my flight was 45 minutes late. Boeing was terrible on my Chicago trip.

What is wrong with my last statement? The experience I had on my first flight was from Southwest Airlines and the second was Delta. The technology these airlines used was, for the most part, exactly the same. The experience however, was much different. Boeing was not responsible for my expected outcome. Southwest and Delta were.

Southwest entered a business with non-proprietary technology and managed to shake-up the industry and become one of the most profitable airlines year-in and year out. They looked at every part of the airline business process and changed things that got in the way of achieving their main objective. This lowered costs, made flying more affordable, and improved outcomes while enabling them to be profitable. They didn’t really invent anything. They simply applied new processes to a business that was ripe for a change.

The same opportunities exist in many industries where the technology is simply the tool. Company A creates a product and other companies either use it for their business as Southwest does or they resell, implement, and service some technology. The differentiator in the end isn’t the technology, but the services around the technology.

In the HR and Benefits business many service providers including benefits brokers seem to be missing this concept. They think they have to bring employers the best “aircraft” versus understanding the service model needed to provide better outcomes. The result of focusing on the technology is a lack of understanding of the services.

Another misperception when it comes to technology is the cost. In many industries, the cost of the technology is small compared to the cost of making it run the right way and supporting it. When I fly from Boston to Chicago the majority of the costs are for things other than the aircraft. I saw a statistic that said the cost of the aircraft itself on a per person basis was around $30 per flight.

When it comes to HR and Benefits technology these same rules apply. The cost of the technology often pales in comparison to the cost of implementing, supporting, and operating the system. Yet many are still focused on the cost of the technology. I regularly replace low-cost benefits enrollment systems that actually drive costs up because of all the necessary workarounds because the technology lacked functionality. If I need to fly from Boston to Chicago a single engine plane would not be the optimum technology.

So, when it comes to Benefits technology you must ask yourself, are you Boeing or are you Southwest? Or are you neither? Are companies like ADP, Paychex, bswift, or Namely, more like Southwest or are they Boeing? Or are they both? Maybe trying to be both is the problem.

The HR and Benefits technology business, and maybe the benefits business as a whole could use a little Southwest. While your competitors are looking for that better jet the opportunity to help the employer in their journey is much greater. You can even drive down costs more by understanding the process than beating up some technology vendor. The result can be lower costs and better outcomes. Who doesn’t want that?

“Alexa – What is my deductible?”


When it comes to adoption of technology simple is most often better than complex. Steve Jobs and Apple went to great lengths to make their products simple. Without user adoption products fail. Current technology trends continue the move towards simplicity with the advent of artificial intelligence and personal assistant tools like Amazon’s Echo and the Google Home. Before you know it, these tools will enter the benefits world. The question is, who is going to be first and best? And if I am a benefits broker how does this impact my business?

While many brokers are aware of the vendors that call on them or have tradeshow booths at industry conferences, I believe the benefits technology race is going to heat up with new competition entering the market. These new competitors see the market opportunity to automate large segments of our economy including health insurance and health care. You may have heard of some of these companies like Microsoft, Google, Salesforce.com, and Apple. This would be in addition to current leaders such as ADP and Paychex. The stakes of the game will change and the price of entry, from an investment standpoint, is in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Those with the capital will quickly outpace those with less capital.

Don’t be surprised when you start to see major mergers and acquisitions in the HR and Benefits space. Could Microsoft buy Ultimate Software? Why not? They already purchased LinkedIn and recently hinted at getting deeper into the HR space.

When I look at products like the Amazon Echo and Google Home I see products that have very quickly grabbed market share with high rates of adoption. My wife, who is not an early adopter of technology, quickly became a user of Google Home. Why? Because it is easy. Would she have a better understanding of her health insurance if she could simply ask Google? Absolutely!

Benefits technology, on the other hand, has not had broad adoption by employees. Yes, employers have bought systems or brokers have given them away, but when you look at utilization on the employee side it is abysmal. I believe the reason for this is because there is not enough value as a stand-alone solution to generate broad adoption. Keep in mind that the majority of people hardly use their health care in a given year so there is little need to access such a system. I don’t know about you but I can hardly remember the login to my computer never mind something I may not use for 6 months.

The next generation of technology in the HR and Benefits area is going to have broader and “everyday” value, while being much easier to use. Market leading vendors, especially those with a great deal of capital, will invest in the latest technologies to try and win the technology race and gain more customers. And before you know it you will be saying the following:

“Alexa, is Dr. John Smith from Boston in the Blue Cross network?”

“Ok Google, request Friday off from work?”

“Hey Siri, how much does the average office visit cost?”

“Alexa, what is the balance of my 401k?”

“Ok Google, transfer $500 from my savings to checking?”

The advancement of technology and artificial intelligence has enabled many to have more personalized user experiences. Your Amazon Echo will “get to know you”. Maybe in the near future your doctor will get to know you a little better too.

Many benefits brokers have chosen some technology vendor with a mission of putting as many clients on the system as possible. This is a risky position competitively as more advanced solutions from highly capitalized companies come along. I don’t know many sales people or business owners in any industry who like running around with the 8th best product. Even more so when it is not necessary. The market and your customers do not care if you have invested thousands of dollars on some technology that may quickly fall out of favor.

One should take the advice of Jack Welch, ex- CEO of General Electric who once said,

“If the rate of change on the outside exceeds the rate of change on the inside, the end is near.”

For those that have purchased the Amazon Echo or Google Home you don’t have to look far to see that the outside world is changing faster than the inside. The health insurance and health care industries often feel like they are moving at a snail’s pace. Private Exchanges were lauded as change when they really are a reincarnation of cafeteria plans from the 80’s.

With the Trump administration, changes in health insurance legislation may create a shift that empowers the consumer. The industry may need an army of people on the front lines to help the industry move to a whole new paradigm. The vendors will need help and the employers and employees will need it too. The technology is there. Alexa is ready. Are you?

Your Competitors May Not Be Who You Think


This past week there were two press releases related to the benefits brokerage business that were fairly significant. One of them was picked up by the industry publications, generated some kudos on LinkedIn, and created some noise in the benefits community. Brokers were talking about it and many emailed me or called me to see what I thought.

The other one went mostly unnoticed in the benefits world. The industry pubs didn’t pick it up and I did not get a single phone call asking my opinion. Yet, from my perspective, the second press release will have a greater impact on the average benefits broker than the first.

This contrast made me think of a quote I keep on my wall that reminds me to not be complacent. It is from Jim Keyes, the former CEO of Blockbuster Video, who once said:

“Neither RedBox nor Netflix are even on the radar screen in terms of competition,” he said. “It’s more Wal-Mart and Apple.”

We all know how that turned out.

The first press release announced the merger of 20+ benefits firms, many who I know. While this is noteworthy, I am not sure that the world is any different today because of it. Yesterday they were wearing one uniform and today they are wearing another. They are the same people, in the same locations, and until there is some other new big announcement they are probably doing pretty much the same thing today that they were doing yesterday.

From a competitive standpoint, I am pretty sure this event won’t change the landscape much. Most brokers are already competing with larger firms that use their size and resources as their competitive advantage. Some brokers may even think this is good for them competitively because their market just lost another boutique firm and the competition of local boutique firms just got smaller. In reality, not much has changed until someone brings something new to the market.

The second press release was from a company called Namely. Namely raised an additional $50 million in capital bringing their total capital raise to $157.8 million. (Source: Venture Beat January 5, 2017) Concurrently, Namely also announced the following:

“Namely also announced today a new benefits offering called the Namely Health Advantage, which groups together similar companies to offer their employees health benefits at preferred rates.”

What makes this significant is that Namely has brought something new to the market. They have developed an engaging HR-Benefits-Payroll platform promising simplicity and ease of use. They also act as a benefits broker, creating a single source technology and service offering to employers. And as can be seen from the quote above, they created a new health insurance offering for their clients.

Namely claims to have 650 clients totaling 120,000 employees which would be an average client size of around 185 employees. Unlike companies like Zenefits, that targets much smaller employers (< 50 employees), Namely targets mid-market employers ranging from 100 – 1000 employees. From a competitive standpoint, this is the sweet spot for many benefits firms.

If you do the math and assume they are generating revenue at a $25 per employee per month rate, then their annual revenue would be in the range of $36 million. This is a real rough guess. Even if I am off by $10 million it would not be bad for a company that was founded in 2012. That would make them one of the fastest growing benefits brokers in the country. Though I am sure they would not classify themselves as such.

In 2015 there was $2.4 billion invested in HR Technology type companies. And as one industry analyst said, “Do you know what they will do with that money in 2016 and 2017”? Spend it. They will spend it on marketing and sales. They will have Ads on LinkedIn and Google. They will be at all the HR trade shows. They will be everywhere marketing to your customers and prospects. Namely has even had TV commercials on Fox News. I don’t see many brokers advertising on TV.

I could imagine asking the average benefits broker about their competition and it would not surprise me if they responded as follows:

“Neither Namely nor Zenefits are even on the radar screen in terms of competition,” he said. “It’s more Gallagher, Mercer, and USI.”

You may not have recognized this competition yet. Many brokers say they never lost a case to Namely or similar companies. What they don’t know is how many prospects they lost to these firms. How many employers looking for solutions found Namely but did not find you? How many prospects would respond to their value proposition versus yours? Do you even know what their value proposition is?

There is a way to meet and beat this new competition. But is takes work, planning, investment, and risk taking. Or maybe these firms are really nothing to worry about. Ask Jim Keyes what he thinks.

It’s a Saturday night and I should go. I could end this article by saying I am going to be watching a movie on Netflix tonight but playoff football is on, and anyone who knows me would know I am lying. But if you want to learn about these new competitors and what you can do to compete with them, check out our latest webinar titled, “The Future of Human Capital Management and Benefits” by clicking on this link.

Webinar Invite – Taking Benefits and HR to the Next Level in 2017


I know, another webinar invite. This is a really good one though. If you are a benefits broker I guarantee this is worth 45 minutes of your time. Here is the bottom-line with this webinar. We have been delivering technology solutions to both brokers and employers for 16 years now and have seen gaps in the market over that time that are actually being magnified now as the market changes. Many brokers and most employers are often not recognizing those gaps. We think that by filling those gaps you can take an employer’s HR from a 3 to a 9 and improve a broker’s operation in similar ways.

In this webinar, we will share some but not all the secrets. We then introduce a model that we think is quite unique.

The dates are: January 5th, 10th and 12th at 12:00 – 1:00 Eastern Time

If you are a broker and have an interest in attending feel free to click on the link below to register. If we don’t know who you are we may give you a call before approving access to the webinar. Thanks.

Register Here

“Fire” – Obamacare is Not the Only Healthcare Plan That is Burning


I had a short conversation today with a woman that was somewhat surprising and maybe very telling. I was having a prescription filled and I spoke briefly with the women handling my order. I had to give her my new insurance card (third carrier in 3 years) and mentioned how I had to switch often because of price increases. She then told me that she had a $4000 deductible and close to $15,000 in debt from medical bills. I was shocked. Her employer is a major employer and more than likely a benefactor of Obamacare, yet her deductible is $4000 and she has medical bills causing financial duress. I would imagine this story plays out across America. It is a system that is more than broken. It is on FIRE!

In this political environment where Obamacare is in the news daily I think the problems with employer-based insurance gets lost in the discussion. It seems like people have created a one-to-one relationship between Obamacare and the Exchanges. It is the Exchanges getting huge increases. Insurance companies are leaving the Exchanges because of big losses. Many markets only have one option. And of course you won’t have to switch your doctor. All this noise may be hiding the fire that is also burning in the employer healthcare market.

On the employer side, some of the same dire stories are playing out except the press seems to be ignoring them. Sure, if you look for stories like I do you will find them, but they aren’t on the front page of the NY Times or the lead story on the Nightly News. Relative to the fire burning in the Exchanges the employer fire is smaller, but it is still a big fire. I am sure the woman at the pharmacy was much more concerned about her personal “fire” from her healthcare expenses than what is going on with the Exchanges.

If you have employer based insurance, then you more than likely have a single medical insurance option. Your contributions may have increased by 30% or more over the past few years. Your deductibles and coinsurance may have doubled. You don’t even know what coinsurance means. And the odds are greater than 50% that you don’t have enough money in a savings account to pay for your deductible if needed.

If you are an employer, you are tired of the regular rate increases and delivering bad news to your employees. You have not been able to give employees raises. You may have tried PEO’s, captives, wellness programs, cost shifting, HSA’s, self-funding on smaller and smaller groups, or private exchanges, to try and control costs, but at best, are these are temporary fixes if they even work at all. I was once asked how can you reduce health care costs. I said don’t hire anyone old. Is that what this will come to?

While the focus of Obamacare has been on the Exchanges, Obamacare technically covers health insurance in its totality. Employer based insurance is a part of it and it is part of the problem. Fixing health care includes all of it, not just the Exchanges. It is all related. Government intervention putting the squeeze on individual policies, small group, Medicare and Medicaid only shifts the problem to employer plans. And when an employer with a younger population counters that action by going self-funded this results in the younger, healthier people, not contributing to the pool. We heard this before, you need the young to participate for this to work. The recent race to get younger groups self-insured impacts the entire system. The game goes on.

We can all speculate as to what Trump is going to do to try and fix the healthcare problem. Based on what I have been reading his focus is not limited to the Exchanges. He recognizes the problems span the entire healthcare industry and that includes the problems with employer-based health insurance.

For benefits brokers it would be naïve to think that the only change to employer-based insurance will be the elimination of the employer mandate. There is a fire burning at the employer level too and this fire is not unrelated to the other fires burning on the Exchanges. Most of the conversations I hear, or articles I have read, reference the Exchanges as something totally separate from employer-based insurance. I believe one can’t be solved without significant changes being made to the other. Anticipating what those changes will be and becoming part of the solution is a big opportunity. Stay tuned because we are about to see what the next administration has in store.

Beware the Benefits Blind Spot


In the most recent election the one thing we learned was that the media, and probably most Americans, had a blind spot. For some reason, they did not want to see or hear what many Americans were thinking. And maybe, for some reason, people did not want to say what they were thinking, until that is, when they went to vote. Now this is not a political discussion as I am sure many are tired of political debates by now. But this does remind me of an article I wrote this spring titled, “Two health care stories – Which do you believe?”, that is worth bringing up again. In the article, I wrote about two stories being told about how to solve the health care problem in America. The problem is the noise created by one side was drowning out the other, creating a benefits blind spot.

Now that Trump has won the election the articles and chatter about how Trump is going to reform healthcare is growing at a rapid pace. The noise is getting loud again. Yet, as I read some of the articles, blogs, and chat going on, I am sensing that the benefits blind spot still exists. It may be getting even worse now that the Hillary plan of a public option appears to be in the rearview mirror. Having such a blind spot, when running a business, or when running for President, can have negative consequences.

I don’t recall where I read it but I once read that one of the keys to marketing and messaging is to try to say what the buyer is thinking. And buyers don’t always tell you what they are thinking, even when you ask. So, you need to try to understand the buyer. To do this you need to ask and answer some tough questions, as if you were in their shoes.

What do employers want? Do they want to be worrying about whether they just hired a person who has a wife at home pregnant with triplets? Do they want to be telling their employees their costs are going up again every year? When I spoke at a conference about Private Exchanges I asked some employers why they would be interested in a Private Exchange. You know what the answer was. They thought a Private Exchange would get them out of the health insurance risk business. It was an out for them, at least they thought so.

What do employees want? Or maybe we should be asking, what do consumers want?What is more important for most people, broader access or lower costs? Do they want portable insurance? Do they want penalties for not participating in a wellness program? Do they want national healthcare?

When you think back on the Presidential campaign there were signs everywhere of a potential Trump victory. Trump rallies were like sold-out rock concerts. When I was in Florida on Election Day I mentioned to my wife about how many Trump signs we saw and how few Hillary ones there were. The Trump campaign apparently saw things most didn’t. In the final days, he was campaigning in states like Michigan where most people thought he was going to lose. Maybe the signs were there but people either did not want to see them or were simply not looking. It appears Trump was delivering a message many people wanted to hear.

This may be happening in the healthcare market right now. It is not just ObamaCare that is broken. ObamaCare could be an unintentional distraction that may be creating a blind spot as to what is going on. There may be a silent majority that wants a different type of healthcare system. And they won’t tell their broker or insurance carrier because in their eyes you may be part of the “establishment”. And the establishment often does not want change.

To prepare your business for the future one needs to understand what the future will look like. To do so will require that you eliminate the blind spots. I have shared my personal views about where I think the market is going several times in the past. The Trump election has changed it a little but I too have to be careful so that I don’t bias my own views. If the healthcare market goes to where I think it is going I believe there are big opportunities for those that provide value in the new market. But what about those that don’t change. Well, it was Barack Obama that said clearly, “Elections have consequences.”